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power-flower & NeckLAdle and NeckLAdle*

power-flower is a brooch that also acts a sort of purse. It is flower akin to Georg Jensen’s classical daisy brooch with a bud made in silver and elastic, into which ten folded bills have been pushed: dollars, kroner or euros. The money is easily pulled out and spent. Thus, the brooch comments on the function of much jewellery as an external indication of the wearer’s spending power. Thus, the brooch doubles as a sort of purse, and it works equally well with just one or two petals. power-flower is a very literal contribution to the debate about values that many of Borup’s conceptual objects revolve around. Jewellery is often used as a status symbol, and people are typically more willing to pay for precious metals than for good ideas and creativity. The title "power-flower" is a play on the term flower-power, questioning what happened to the values of that era. As a shape, the flower is a classic choice for jewellery, and this brooch is a deliberate play on Georg Jensen’s daisy brooch, which has acquired iconic value over the years. It is the essence of good taste, good craftsmanship and, thus, a guarantee that buyers get “full value for their money”. Of course, the flower is also a reference to nature, and because the petals are made of money, it reintroduces the old debate about nature versus culture, which remains so valid today, with CO2 pollution and global warming on the top of the agenda. The product includes folding instructions, so that the user can fold new petals.


NeckLAdle is a necklace made from a ladle that has been sawed into pieces and put on a red silk string with a silver clasp. NeckLAdle is made of a new ladle in blond wood, while NeckLAdle* is made from a used, darkened ladle. With NeckLAdle, Katrine Borup wants to question the conventional understanding of value. Could a ladle that one’s mother used to serve hundreds of meals be as valuable as, or maybe even more valuable than, a piece of gold jewellery?

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Katrine Borup

b. 1965, Danish Architect and Jewellery Designer

Borup graduated from the Aarhus School of Architecture in 1995 and from Guldsmedehøjskolen, Institut for Ædelmetal in 2001. Katrine Borup is preoccupied with the communicative aspects of jewellery and how it relates to the body as a sign and a statement. Her work is typically quite conceptual, initiating from a specific theme, which she then investigates thoroughly. Her work is analytical and exploratory, questioning our traditional understanding of jewellery. The theme she is working with dictates her choice of material, but she often uses familiar materials that are not necessarily normally used in jewellery-making such as wooden spoons and rubber glover. Borup’s work centres on investigating how these often worthless materials may be ascribed value when placed in the context of jewellery. Katrine Borup’s work has been recognized with awards both from the Danish Arts Foundation and from the Jubilee Foundation of the Danish National Bank. She received Kunsthåndværkerprisen in 2002.

img j-kb-01/neckLADle
L: 40/ Dia: 15
wood/red
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img j-kb-02/nedkLADle*
L: 40/ Dia: 15
wood/red
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img j-kb-03/Dollaris
Dia: 13, 5

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img j-kb-04/Kroneris
Dia: 15

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img j-kb-05/Eurois
Dia: 13, 5

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